Q: What do genderqueer and gender non-binary mean?

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A: Gender non-binary: A person whose gender identity does not fit within the socially defined binary of man or woman. Genderqueer: A person who does not identify with the normative gender identities of male or female, similar to gender non-binary.
Q: How common is spectatoring?

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A: Spectatoring (worrying about how you look during sex rather than focusing on sensations) is very common but makes sex less pleasurable. 46% of users say they do this often.
Q: What is the shot (Depo Provera) contraceptive?

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A: The shot is a hormonal birth control option that is 99% effective. It requires getting an injection every 12 weeks (a commonly cited benefit is not having to remember to take a pill every day).
Q: How common is queefing ("vaginal flatulence")?

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A: 81% of sexually active women aged 18-32 say they've experienced queefing. It happens when a trapped pocket of air gets pushed out of the vagina, and is totally harmless/natural.
Q: What should I do if I miss a birth control pill?

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A: Take the late pill ASAP and take the rest of your pills at the usual time. If 2+ days late, use back-up birth control for 7 days (e.g. condom).
Q: Do most women show symptoms for STDs?

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A: 70%+ don't show any symptoms for chlamydia, 80% don't have symptoms for gonorrhea, and most don't have symptoms for HPV. Use condoms and get tested annually.
Q: Is it safe to swallow semen/sperm?

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A: Yes — Semen is mostly composed of water with a few nutrients and <1% sperm. Assuming your partner has been tested for STIs, it's completely safe.
Q: How soon do I have to take Plan B (emergency contraceptive) after unprotected sex?

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A: The emergency contraceptive pill is 89% effective for up to 72 hours after unprotected sex, and may still be effective for up to 5 days after. However, take it as soon as possible.
Q: Is it safe to use a condom in the shower?

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A: Yes! However, be sure not to use oil-based lubricants, and be careful with soap. The oils in these products can degrade latex condoms, making them less effective.
Q: Can you get pregnant from anal sex?

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A: Sperm needs to enter the vagina to fertilize an egg, not the anus, but there is some risk if semen gets into the vaginal opening during anal sex. It's safest to use a condom for anal too.
Q: When can I start having sex again after getting an IUD?

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A: The non-hormonal IUD is effective immediately after insertion, while the hormonal IUD can take up to 7 days to become effective, so be sure to use a secondary method during that period!
Q: Is painful sex normal?

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A: If you're experiencing pain, don't just accept it! There are many causes including vaginal dryness, insufficient foreplay, infection, or psychological causes. See a doctor to find the cause and right solution.
Q: How do I safely change the time of day I take my birth control pill?

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A: Wait until you start a new pack, and then simply take the new pill at the new time you want to switch to. Make sure you don't allow more than 24 hrs in between pills!
Q: How do I know if I've had an orgasm?

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A: Sex can feel great regardless of orgasm, and everyone experiences orgasms differently (not like the movies/porn). They typically involve a tense buildup, followed by involuntary vaginal contractions, then intense relief/relaxation.
Q: Does watching lesbian porn mean I'm gay?

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A: No, it just means you're turned on by watching other women have sex. In fact, lesbian porn is one of the most popular genres. Many women like that it focuses more on oral sex and female pleasure than "straight" porn.
Q: What's the best way to keep your pubic area and vagina clean?

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A: Only wash the vulva (outside parts, e.g. labia), not inside the vagina, and wash the skin around the anus. Use warm water and gentle soap, but nothing with harsh chemicals like douches. Be gentle — don't scrub.
Q: Can you have sex while on your period?

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A: Yes — totally safe, and ~50% of Confi women users say they do. It's still possible to get pregnant and get STDs while menstruating though, so use a condom.
Q: What is a pap smear?

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A: A test doctors use to check for early signs of cervical cancer. Your doctor will use a device that looks like a duck beak (a speculum) to open your vagina. Its primary purpose ISN'T to test for STDs.
Q: How old do you have to be to buy plan B (emergency contraceptive)?

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A: Anyone ANY AGE can now buy Plan B without a prescription. You can buy it at a drug store or clinic for ~$35-60.
Q: How common are Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs)?

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A: Half of women aged 18-32 say they've had a UTI. 31% say they have had more than 1 UTI before. Super common (but still a pain).
Q: How do I get birth control pills?

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A: In the U.S., you need a prescription, so visit your doctor or clinic. With Medicaid and most health insurance plans, the pill should be free. In some cases, you may have to pay a portion (up to $50 per month).
Q: What is erectile dysfunction and is it common?

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A: It's the inability to get and keep an erection firm enough for sex. More than 34 million men in the U.S. are affected (25% are diagnosed under 40 yrs old). If you experienced performance anxiety once, it does not necessarily mean you suffer from ED.
Q: What are Kegel Exercises for?

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A: Kegel exercises strengthen your pelvic floor and are often prescribed for pregnant women, but are useful for everyone (helps control your bladder and for stronger orgasms).
Q: How common is using lubricant during sex?

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A: 43% of Confi women users say they've used lubricant during sex. Those who use lubricant say they LOVE it! Research also shows lubricant increases sexual satisfaction for most women.

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